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CUSTOMISATION - NEXT REVOLUTION IN DESIGN

Creative Review: CUSTOMISATION - NEXT REVOLUTION IN DESIGN

 

Unless we’re super-rich, we’re used to the idea that we wear clothes the manufacturers choose to make — usually with their logo on, so we’re walking around advertising their brand like some kind of sandwich board. But this is the age of the customer, and all that seems to be changing.​

 

 

Up the Revolution​​

 

“Customisation will be the next revolution in luxury,” says José Neves, founder and CEO of online retailer Farfetch. “We wanted to find a way of offering luxury and bespoke products to an audience that’s increasingly knowledgeable about style and quality.”

 

Farfetch isn’t by any means the only company that’s seen this revolution coming and jumped on board. Walk down Regent Street, and half a dozen of the leading fashion outlets allow you to personalise items while you wait, whether it’s a monogrammed scarf from Burberry, a personalised patch at Polo Ralph Lauren, or initialled luggage at Louis Vuitton.

 

It’s not rocket science, either. Many of these customised alterations can be done at the tap of a tablet.

 

 

Creative Review: CUSTOMISATION - NEXT REVOLUTION IN DESIGN

 

 

Bring in your own designer​​

 

Prestigious West End stores are likely to be with us for a long time, of course, but retail in general is changing. And, as might be expected, it’s online retailers who are leading the way in using cutting-edge technology to deliver customised fashion and other luxury goods.

Farfetch are among the leaders in this, working with software designers Platforme to revolutionise brands such as Nicholas Kirkwood, Toga Pulla and Sergio Rossi. Customers browsing online can design their own product from thousands of variables.

 

One of the richest fields for this kind of innovation seems to be knitwear. Companies from Unmade and Eileen Fisher to Ministry of Supply and adidas are applying sophisticated software to 3D knitting machines that allows personalised garments to be made quickly and simply. Eileen Fisher, in partnership with Intel, uses a customer-facing machine that can create a bespoke garment in forty-five minutes.

 

The future is personalised​​​​

 

But is there really a demand for this kind of service? According to Deloitte, one in three shoppers said they’d be interested in personalised products, and many would be willing to pay more for them. Indeed, Deloitte have even suggested that fashion brands who ignore this trend are likely to quickly fall behind the market.

 

This isn’t really a surprise for us at Creative Solution, where we’ve known for many years that discerning customers value a quality, personal service over something that’s cheap, easy and generic. The world of fashion and luxury goods seems to be catching up with this ethos, and who knows what sectors will be affected next.

 

Personalised food, perhaps?

 

Creative Review: CUSTOMISATION - NEXT REVOLUTION IN DESIGN 

 

 

You’re reading this because you want something designed. But actually, you want more than that.

 

You want an agency that’s engaged enough to understand your objectives, experienced enough to turn them into a reality, and creative enough to leave you thrilled with the results. You’ve just found us.

 

Creative Review: CUSTOMISATION - NEXT REVOLUTION IN DESIGN

 

Unless we’re super-rich, we’re used to the idea that we wear clothes the manufacturers choose to make — usually with their logo on, so we’re walking around advertising their brand like some kind of sandwich board. But this is the age of the customer, and all that seems to be changing.​